Good Eats

Chef to Know: The Catbird Seat's Trevor Moran

By Jed PortmanGood EatsSeptember 30, 2014

American chefs of a certain caliber like to brag about time spent in the kitchen at Noma, the Copenhagen restaurant often ranked at or near the top of world’s-best-restaurant lists. The kitchen hosts apprentices from all over the world who spend a few busy weeks, or maybe a few months, working with the staff, mark the experience on their resumes, and return home. Less common, however, is the career path of chef Trevor Moran. As a sous chef at Noma, the thirty-something native of Dublin, Ireland, spent four years helping to direct the menu. Now, he is putting skills learned in Denmark to use in Nashville as the head chef at the Catbird Seat, a daring and intimate restaurant previously known for chefs Erik Anderson and Josh Habiger’s artful interpretations of American flavors: hot chicken skin with white bread purée, charred oak ice cream. Moran is making his own name with madcap dishes such as the dessert he served at last week’s Music City Food + Wine Festival, a potato-infused—and potato-shaped—cream puff buried in chocolate “dirt.”

Read More »

Send Us Your Tailgating Recipes

By Jed PortmanGood EatsSeptember 19, 2014

Filbert, South Carolina, peach farmers and lifelong Clemson Tiger fans Ben and Merwyn Smith have been tailgating in the shadow of Death Valley for more than fifty years. 

Read More »

The South in a Jar

By CJ LotzGood EatsSeptember 17, 2014

You’ve likely heard of Tupelo honey, the South’s most prized single-flower honey, produced in and around the Florida panhandle when tupelo trees burst into bloom each spring. And you might know a little something about Sourwood honey, that deep and spicy nectar of Appalachia. But what about the dark, molasses-like honey gathered from Florida’s black mangrove, avocado, and loquat blossoms? Or the bright and grassy honey gathered from Eastern Shore butterbean plants? Honey is deeply nuanced. Like fine wine or whiskey, it’s layered in flavor, aroma, and history. The editors at G&G sampled varieties bursting with the essence of the South. The result of our sticky taste-test? Five honeys that will leave a taste of sweet Southern sunshine even when summer is long gone.

Read More »

Corn Meets Corn Liquor

By Jed PortmanGood EatsSeptember 16, 2014

Bourbon wouldn’t be bourbon without corn. Literally. American law requires that any whiskey perched alongside the bottles of Maker’s Mark and Buffalo Trace at the liquor store come from a mash that is at least fifty-one percent corn, with a remainder of barley, wheat, or rye. So infusing the flavor of fresh corn into brown liquor made a sort of intuitive sense for Chris Spear, the Frederick, Maryland–based chef and culinary instructor who writes the blog Perfect Little Bites. “At first, I thought I’d just throw some corn into some bourbon and see if I could get the flavor I wanted,” he says. After some trial and error, he added a second step to the process: dosing the whiskey with a little melted butter, which leaves behind a tinge of flavor and a rich, silky texture

Read More »

Field Guide: Pawpaw

By Jed PortmanGood EatsSeptember 11, 2014

In foraging literature, the pawpaw, a soft, pale-green fruit indigenous to the temperate forests of the eastern United States, is allotted a produce aisle’s worth of flavors, among them mango, banana, pineapple, and melon. “I think it tastes like if you were to make mango and banana cupcakes, and then eat the batter,” says Richard Neal, the chef de cuisine at the Capitol Grille in Nashville. “It’s sweet, and tropical, and super soft.”

Read More »

Southern Food Group: Cornbread

By Sara Camp ArnoldGood EatsSeptember 2, 2014

The Southern Foodways Alliance and Garden & Gun decided to rewrite the food pyramid in 2014 by introducing the twelve Southern food groups. Thus far, we’ve covered oysters, gumbo, boudin, fried chicken, barbecue, hot tamales, and greens. This month, sop it all up with a big square of cornbread.

Read More »

Better Burger Toppers

By Jed PortmanGood EatsAugust 28, 2014

In his professional life, chef Tim Byres spends an awful lot of time standing over hot embers. Smoke, his five-year-old restaurant in Dallas, takes its name from the smoldering arsenal of cookers out back: a smokehouse, a smoker, and a wood-fueled grill. Even when he’s not on the clock he mans the tongs at home and on family camping trips. This is a man who knows how to grill a burger. And the secret to a great one, he says, isn’t the cuts of beef involved, or how they’re ground. It’s a solid roster of quality homemade condiments. Upgrading to a garden-fresh ketchup or a smoky chile mustard is that extra bit of effort that can take a Labor Day spread from run-of-the-mill to something you’ll still be remembering when the long holiday weekend is long gone.

Read More »

Make This Now: Korean-Southern Ribs

By Jed PortmanGood EatsAugust 28, 2014

With all due respect for tradition, there's plenty of room for growth in barbecue, as writer John T. Edge noted when he visited Heirloom Market BBQ on his recent tour of Atlanta’s Korean restaurants. The hybrid dishes on the menu at Heirloom Market—one of two Korean-Southern restaurants that chef Cody Taylor runs with his wife, former pop star Jiyeon Lee—are certainly attention-grabbing: Your grandmother probably didn’t dose her slaw with kimchi, and chances are you’ve never seasoned pork butt with gochujang paste, a fermented slurry of chiles, rice, and soy that's popular on the Korean peninsula. Cooked with love by comfort food enthusiasts from different parts of the world, though, the fare makes perfect sense. The ribs at Heirloom Market benefit from a very literal meeting of cuisines: a Georgia-style dry rub and a sweet, Korean-style barbecue sauce flavored with gochujang and Sprite.

Read More »

Cocktail Hour: Bourbon Root Beer Float

By Jed PortmanGood EatsAugust 18, 2014

Rob McDaniel met Will Abner for the first time in a field in southwestern Virginia. They were both at Lambstock, shepherd Craig Rogers’s bacchanalian annual gathering of farmers, chefs, bartenders, and other food-and-beverage types. "I was finding wood sorrel and wild shiso in the fields up there. Will just started making cocktails with it. I thought, 'That’s pretty cool,'" says McDaniel, who runs the kitchen at SpringHouse in Alexander City, Alabama. "When I went back to the restaurant, I said to our front-of-house manager, 'We’ve really got to talk to this guy.' He was just slinging drinks then, you know, at some bar that closed at three a.m."

Read More »

Stocking a Farm-to-Table Bar

By Jed PortmanGood EatsAugust 14, 2014

At the beginning of the summer, the bartenders at Woodberry Kitchen in Baltimore began to run out of verjus, the tart juice of unripe grapes. At nearly any other bar in the country, a shortage of an ingredient like verjus might mean a gentle shift in the menu. At Woodberry, it meant a complete renovation of the cocktail program.

Read More »

Pages

Subscribe to Good Eats